French Foreign Policy from Fashoda to Serajevo (1898-1914)

French Foreign Policy from Fashoda to Serajevo (1898-1914)

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French Foreign Policy from Fashoda to Serajevo (1898-1914)

French Foreign Policy from Fashoda to Serajevo (1898-1914)

Read FREE!

Excerpt

As the United States is slowly being brought to the realization that an American policy of isolation is no longer possible, the fact that European diplomacy has a fundamental effect upon our own foreign policy is becoming correspondingly evident. The result has been a greater interest in foreign politics, and a keener desire to solve the problem of international relationships. The best hope that we have of avoiding world conflicts in the future seems to be in a League of Nations, which would not only offer the means of settling disputes by other methods than that of war, but would possess the power to compel the employment of these peaceful methods. But even with a League of Nations, we must have an intelligent appreciation of the underlying causes of national antagonisms, with a view to remedying them before an acute situation arises, if we are to have an enduring peace.

When Bismarck imposed the unjust and humiliating Treaty of Frankfort upon France, the spirit of the revanche was born. Instead of trying to come to an agreement with the neighbor whom she had despoiled, thereby making a reconciliation possible, Germany depended upon the secret treaties of the Triple Alliance to overawe France and to maintain her own dominant position. But France could also make secret treaties. The Dual Alliance and the Triple Entente were her answer. This created the famous balance of power upon . . .

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