John Colet and Marsilio Ficino

John Colet and Marsilio Ficino

John Colet and Marsilio Ficino

John Colet and Marsilio Ficino

Excerpt

The existence of the manuscript materials which are the subject of this study was first pointed out to me by Mr. Neil Ker, Librarian of Magdalen College, and Reader in Palaeography at Oxford; in gratitude for this and many other intellectual debts to Mr. Ker over a period of ten years I have dedicated the work to him. The materials themselves are now in the keeping of the Warden and Fellows of All Souls College, Oxford, who have generously given me permission to publish this part of their treasure. In preparing the materials for SYSTEMation I have been much assisted by Mr. J. B. Trapp, of the Warburg Institute, and Mr. A. E. Wardman, of the University of Reading. The details of their assistance are explained in the Introduction, but I should like to express here my gratitude for their essentially collaborative assistance with the text and translation.

Although the project began and ended in England, it owes its existence mainly to American agencies for the encouragement of research. The work was begun during a year's study in England in 1954-5, under the auspices of the Fulbright Program and the Guggenheim Foundation. It was sustained for three years by generous assistance from the Research Committees of the University of Virginia and the Claremont Graduate School. Arrangements for publication were made by The Renaissance Society of America; to the editorial committee and officers of that Society, especially Mr. W. G. Constable, President, and Professor Josephine W. Bennett, Secretary, I am indebted for generous encouragement as well as searching criticism. Mr. John Zeigel and Dennis Higgins have assisted greatly with the index.

Like all students of Ficino, but much more than most, I am indebted to the amazing philosophical, linguistic, and palaeographical achievements of Professor Paul O. Kristeller. Prodigal of his time, and untouched by professional pettiness, Professor Kristeller is no less impressive in his generosity than in his scholarly gifts. His selfless devotion to the advancement of learning is an inspiration to all who have called upon him for help.

S. J.

Claremont, California . . .

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