Shakespeare and "Demi-Science": Papers on Elizabethan Topics

Shakespeare and "Demi-Science": Papers on Elizabethan Topics

Shakespeare and "Demi-Science": Papers on Elizabethan Topics

Shakespeare and "Demi-Science": Papers on Elizabethan Topics

Excerpt

A WELL KNOWN TEACHER of homiletics -- less learnedly, sermon making -- burst into a group of his friends one day with the remark: "My reputation is gone, and a trial for heresy is in order." As he was a clergyman as notable for his piety as for his learning, we expressed our amazement and inquired into the theological point of his unorthodoxy. "I have failed," he replied, "to fix the geographical spot in which the prodigal son shared his husks with the swine. I do not know whether he traveled east or west to the home of his father. I do not know to which of the ten tribes of Israel this interesting family belonged. And I have even questioned the existence, before the feast, of the fatted calf." Our friend had been explaining that the famous parable was a myth, not an historical occurrence; and his class, which had doubtless been carefully innoculated in the Kindergarten with rationalistic views as to Santa Claus, in horror detected a question as to the stated facts, the authenticity of the Bible.

It seems that Professor Abel Lefranc, of the College de France, has elaborated a theory whereby Shakespeare is once more deprived of authorship in his own . . .

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