A Humanistic Psychology of Education: Making the School Everybody's House

A Humanistic Psychology of Education: Making the School Everybody's House

A Humanistic Psychology of Education: Making the School Everybody's House

A Humanistic Psychology of Education: Making the School Everybody's House

Excerpt

To proclaim that American society is constantly changing is hardly profound: change has become an undeniable fact of our daily lives. But the changes sought in America in the 1970s are unique. They no longer involve merely technological growth, as they have in the past. Today the emphasis is on altering interpersonal relationships, and the educational process is integrally involved in the changing scene. The contemporary focus for change is people-centered and the schools are viewed as an important setting for such change.

In America there has been a growing outcry that many of our traditional schools are emotionally destructive. The surge of alternative schools attests to the sincerity and determination of the critics. Further, alternative schools have attracted not only alienated underachievers and drop-outs but also bright, creative, and "successful" students, as well as a large number of well qualified teachers seeking lively alternatives to the traditional methods of public schools.

The school criticisms themselves are neither partisan nor privileged. They come from citizens in many segments of society, and both from "educational romantics" providing personal testimony on school conditions, such as Herbert Kohl (1969) and James Herndon (1965, 1971) and also from the authors of more detailed and documented analyses, such as Silberman Crisis in the Classroom. These books are being read by many: most are available in general bookstores, some have been offered as popular book club selections, and a few have climbed the best-seller lists. Perhaps most tellingly, such books have made parents and students increasingly aware of their relative powerlessness in choosing from among the educational options available. In some communities, for example, parents and students are now demanding parity with professionals in deciding how schools should be run.

The issues in question among these new groups have to do primarily with relationships among school participants. Increasingly few criticisms seem to be aimed at curricula, facilities or instructional strategies . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.