Oxford Readings in the Greek Novel

Oxford Readings in the Greek Novel

Oxford Readings in the Greek Novel

Oxford Readings in the Greek Novel

Synopsis

This book comprises a new and exciting collection of critical work on the ancient Greek novel. It offers students and researchers twelve of the most influential studies of recent years together with an introduction, by the editor, which explores the nature of the Greek novel in its historical context. The Readings are in two sections. The first examines aspects which are common to several or all of the novels, for example, themes and plots; the portrayal of emotions; the role of the countryside; female readers and characters; and the `historical novel'. The second section contains studies of the narrative and plot of Chariton, the genre of and literary responses to Longus, Achilles Tatius' ego-narrative, the narrative technique and message of Heliodorus, and the humour found in Lucian's A True Story. Six of these pieces have been translated for the first time from French, German, and Italian, thereby bringing some of the best of European scholarship to an Anglophone audience. The most important Greek quotations have been rendered into English making these texts easily accessible to readers without Greek.

Excerpt

The aim of this volume is to provide a selection of the most useful recent work on the ancient Greek novel for those teaching, taking courses on, or researching the subject. A knowledge of Greek is not necessary, since the most important passages cited in Greek have been translated, where this was not done already, using translations drawn from B. P. Reardon Collected Ancient Greek Novels. The readings themselves have for the most part been taken from journals. Studies that are available in English-language books or that have been published very recently have been avoided in accordance with the Publisher's policy for this series, with two exceptions. The selection of pieces is not easy. Some will miss a favourite article or author. It is certainly regrettable that nothing of a suitable standard could be found within the set parameters on Xenophon of Ephesus. His absence from the Specific Studies in Part III is only partly countered by notice taken of him in the selections chosen for the General Studies, Part II, where common issues and problems are explored. A similar difficulty presented itself with Achilles Tatius: here it was felt that an exception to the general policy must be made. Those coming anew to this subject should remember that there is now a great deal of work of the highest quality to be found in books and collections that could not be drawn on for this volume. Some of this work is mentioned in the introductory Chapter I, though its main function is to discuss what the ancient Greek novel is and in particular to explain the course of its study in modern times to the present, including brief comments on the pieces chosen for the volume.

It is a pleasure to acknowledge the generous help and advice of a number of colleagues and friends, most especially Ewen Bowie, Stephen Harrison (editor of the sister-volume, Oxford Readings in the Roman Novel), John Morgan, and Bryan Reardon. Hilary O'Shea, Jenny Wagstaffe, and Georga Godwin at OUP have been supportive and helpful as usual. One of the assets of this series is the inclusion for an Anglophone readership of material written in other . . .

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