Tutorial Essays in Psychology - Vol. 1

Tutorial Essays in Psychology - Vol. 1

Tutorial Essays in Psychology - Vol. 1

Tutorial Essays in Psychology - Vol. 1

Excerpt

Only twenty-five years ago it was quite easy for a single person to digest as it appeared every article published in English on psychology: Deluged as we are today by a torrent of new journals and symposia proceedings, it is hard to believe that such a situation existed so recently. It is difficult enough to keep up with developments in some narrow speciality, let alone with the subject as a whole. Yet work in one corner of the field often remains relevant to the remainder: New developments in animal learning affect thinking in clinical psychology, models of how language is understood suggest profitable approaches to visual perception, discoveries in developmental psychology may help us to specify the nature of the psychological processes to be found in the adult, and whatever function we study we ignore physiological psychology at our peril. There appears at present to be no publication that portrays recent developments in one field of psychology for the benefit of the specialist in another. The Annual Review of Psychology has become for the most part a catalogue of names, and it is difficult to determine from its pages what has actually been found out, let alone how it was discovered or what it means. Most of the articles in the Psychological Review or the Psychological Bulletin are today too technical to be readily understood except by the specialist.

The present series of essays, of which this is the first volume, attempts to describe what is going on in a particular speciality in such a way that it can be easily assimilated by workers in other branches of psychology. The essays do not provide comprehensive reviews of specialized topics: They are intended to convey new concepts and new approaches without covering in exhaustive detail all the relevant experimental work. They should be intelligible to any psychologist regardless of his field and also to the advanced undergraduate student.

It is merely coincidence that three of the four contributions in this volume relate to language or speech. The essays are not aimed at the specialist, and those . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.