Modern Methods for Business Research

Modern Methods for Business Research

Modern Methods for Business Research

Modern Methods for Business Research

Synopsis

This volume introduces the latest popular methods for conducting business research. The goal of each chapter author--a leading authority in a particular subject area--is to provide an understanding of each method with a minimum of mathematical derivations. The chapters are organized within three general interrelated topics--Measurement, Decision Analysis, and Modeling.

The chapters on measurement discuss generalizability theory, latent trait and latent class models, and multi-faceted Rasch modeling. The chapters on decision analysis feature applied location theory models, data envelopment analysis, and heuristic search procedures. The chapters on modeling examine exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, dynamic factor analysis, partial least squares and structural equation modeling, multilevel data analysis, modeling of longitudinal data by latent growth curve methods and structures, and configural models of longitudinal categorical data.

Excerpt

The purpose of this volume is to introduce a selection of the latest popular methods for conducting business research. The goal is to provide an understanding and working knowledge of each method with a minimum of mathematical derivations. It is hoped that the volume will be of value to a wide range of readers and will provide the stimulation for seeking a greater depth of information on each method presented.

The chapters in this volume provide an excellent addition to the methodological literature. Each chapter was written by a leading authority in the particular topic. Interestingly, despite the current popularity of each method in business, a good number of the methods were first developed and popularized in other substantive fields. For example, the factor analytic approach was originally developed by psychologists as a paradigm that was meant to represent hypothetically existing entities or constructs. And yet, these days one rarely sees an article in a business journal that does not refer to some type of exploratory or confirmatory factor analytic model.

Although each chapter in the volume can be read independently, the chapters selected fall into three general interrelated topics: measurement, decision analysis, and modeling. The decision regarding the selection and the organization of the chapters was quite challenging. Obviously, within the limitations of a single volume, only a limited number of topics could be addressed. In the end, the choice of the material was governed by my own belief concerning what are currently the most important modern methods for conducting business research. The first topic, measurement, contains . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.