The Best Cartoons from Punch: Collected for Americans from England's Famous Humorous Weekly

The Best Cartoons from Punch: Collected for Americans from England's Famous Humorous Weekly

The Best Cartoons from Punch: Collected for Americans from England's Famous Humorous Weekly

The Best Cartoons from Punch: Collected for Americans from England's Famous Humorous Weekly

Excerpt

Wherever in this wide world my ship touches the shore, some kindly reporter asks the same silly question -- generally at 6 o'clock in the morning when I am packing and cannot find my passport: "What, in your opinion, is the difference between English and American (Australian, Canadian, Argentinian, Egyptian, Ceylonese) humor?" I always answer: "There isn't any," which shocks them, I know not why. Humor, to my mind, is one of the few earthly blessings about which there can be no claim to sovereign rights. "Man," wrote Hazlitt, in The English Comic writers, "is the only animal that laughs and weeps, for he is the only animal that is struck by the difference between what things are and what they ought to be." There is, of course, another theory. A company of learned men, it is said, were discussing what was "the essence of humor" -- what really made men laugh. Some said it was "incongruity," some said it was "misfortune," and some said this and . . .

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