The Third World Security Predicament: State Making, Regional Conflict, and the International System

The Third World Security Predicament: State Making, Regional Conflict, and the International System

The Third World Security Predicament: State Making, Regional Conflict, and the International System

The Third World Security Predicament: State Making, Regional Conflict, and the International System

Synopsis

"This book is a much-needed exploration of the multifaceted security problems facing the Third World in the aftermath of the Cold War. Ayoob addresses what he perceives to be the major underlying cause of conflict and insecurity in the Third World - i.e., the early stage of state making at which postcolonial states find themselves - drawing comparisons with the West European experience. He argues that this approach provides richer comparative data and less ephemeral conclusions than approaches that adopt development or dependency as their basic organizing concepts. Subsequent chapters analyze the dynamics of interstate conflict in the Third World, the role of Third World countries in the international system, and, especially, the critical impact of the end of the Cold War on the Third World security problematic. Ayoob concludes with a set of explanations intended to help students, scholars, and policymakers decipher the continuing profusion of conflicts in the Third World and the trends and problems that will likely dominate well into the twenty-first century." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

Thomas G. Weiss

I identify with Mohammed Ayoob's views about the Third World's security predicament; and I commend this book to the attention of the wide readership I believe it deserves and am confident it will get.

Ayoob and I have been intellectual sparring partners for a number of years. It has always been professionally rewarding to have him as part of a conference or a collaborative book project. This past year it has been Brown University's and my personal pleasure to welcome him into our community. He has been in residence as part of a generous grant from the Ford Foundation to support ongoing work at the Thomas J. Watson Jr. Institute for International Studies. I would like to express my gratitude to Shepard Forman, director, and Geoffrey Wiseman, program officer, of the International Affairs Program, for having made it possible for Ayoob to have spent 1993 to 1994 at Brown University as the Ford Foundation Fellow in International Security.

This volume is the seventh in a Lynne Rienner book series entitled Emerging Global Issues. However, using the term emerging in conjunction with the "Third World's Security Predicament" is a bit of a misnomer. Third World security has been very much on the policy agenda in one form or another since shortly after World War II; more so since the rapid decolonization of the 1950s and 1960s and the emergence of a distinct group consciousness among developing countries. As Ayoob notes, "The Third World was born into bipolarity and the Cold War." in fact, four of the previous six volumes in the series have touched directly upon elements of the Third World's security predicament.

With the tectonic shifts now underway in world politics, it is increasingly difficult to recall the roots of the rhetorical divisions between rich and poor, capitalist and communist, which dominated international discourse over much of the past five decades. the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) and its conception of the Third World were born in the mid-1950s from the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.