The United States, China, and Arms Control

The United States, China, and Arms Control

The United States, China, and Arms Control

The United States, China, and Arms Control

Excerpt

Before the end of the 1970s the People's Republic of China (PRC) will have deployed a small but significant strategic nuclear force.In 1974 this force probably consisted of as many as 70-80 medium-range and intermediate-range ballistic missiles (MRBMs and IRBMs) and 100 jet-powered medium bombers capable of reaching targets in Asia and the USSR. By the 1980s this force could be supplemented by intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) with a range long enough to reach cities in the United States.Although this Chinese nuclear force will be far inferior to those of the United States and the Soviet Union, both superpowers will have to consider seriously its implications in formulating their strategic and arms control policies.

The rapid movement of events in international politics in the past few years has rendered out of date appraisals made as recently as three or four years ago of the implications of the Chinese nuclear force for the United States.The tension between China and the Soviet Union, the improvement of relations between Peking and Washington, the signing of the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) agreements by the United States and the USSR, developments in Vietnam, and the resurgence of Japan all require a new look at the Chinese nuclear force and its implications for U.S. policy.

The authors of this study endorse the rapprochement with China, the withdrawal of U.S. combat forces from Vietnam, the reversion of Okinawa to Japan, and, in general, the effort to shift to U.S. allies greater . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.