But Is It Art? The Value of Art and the Temptation of Theory

But Is It Art? The Value of Art and the Temptation of Theory

But Is It Art? The Value of Art and the Temptation of Theory

But Is It Art? The Value of Art and the Temptation of Theory

Excerpt

Some of this book is about art, but mostly it is about the philosophy of art and it is also in part about Wittgenstein. One may be forgiven for thinking that this latter pair of topics are like veins that have been pretty well exhausted and for wondering why anyone should have the temerity to suppose that there is anything left in them that is worth getting out. After all, books on the philosophy of art have been appearing recently in astonishing numbers for a subject that within living memory was castigated for its dreariness; and now, more than thirty years after his death, the volume of literature on Wittgenstein is proving positively burdensome.My defense of the undertaking meets these reservations head on by affirming my conviction that both topics are important and that both have, in one way or another, been misunderstood.

The philosophy of art is important because art is important. That, I think, can go without saying, at least it doesn't need to be argued here. If we are going to think about anything as important as art — and it is very difficult not to think about it — it is important that we think clearly about it. One of the burdens of this book is to show that much philosophy of art is not clear thinking. It is the techniques of philosophical investigation that can be learned from Wittgenstein that allow the confusions in recent philosophy of art to be recognized and shown for what they are and it is some rather neglected aspects of his work that permit a better . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.