War of Another Kind: A Southern Community in the Great Rebellion

War of Another Kind: A Southern Community in the Great Rebellion

War of Another Kind: A Southern Community in the Great Rebellion

War of Another Kind: A Southern Community in the Great Rebellion

Synopsis

In this book Durrill describes in graphic detail the disintegration, during the Civil War, of Southern plantation society in a North Carolina coastal county. He details struggles among planters, slaves, yeoman farmers, and landless white laborers, as well as a guerrilla war and a clash between two armies that, in the end, destroyed all that remained of the county's social structure. He examines the failure of a planter-yeoman alliance, and discusses how yeoman farmers and landless white laborers allied themselves against planters, but to no avail. He also shows how slaves, when refugeed upcountry, tried unsuccessfully to reestablish their prerogatives--a subsistence, as well as protection from violence--owed them as a minimal condition of their servitude.

Excerpt

In 1851, ten years before secession, Samuel Newberry, a yeoman farmer and resident of Washington County, North Carolina, stood before a crowd of his neighbors and spoke of the grim future he foresaw: "Let this monstrous doctrine [secession] never come to maturity.This ill-timed step once taken can never be retraced, and you will bring upon the country all the horrors of civil war." "[Y]ou will see your country overrun by a ravaging soldiery ... your now flourishing land will be desolated . . . your slaves will be wrenched from you by military force, and made your equals." "Oh, that the picture I have here drawn may never come to pass," he continued, "nevertheless, if this treasonable scheming and plotting cannot be uprooted, and is allowed to progress, all I have pointed out will happen in ten years from this day."

Samuel Newberry spoke those prescient words on behalf of Edward Stanly, the Whig candidate for a seat in Congress that encompassed several counties around the Albemarle Sound in northeastern North Carolina.Stanly and his party based their appeal to planters and yeoman farmers on the protection of property.Whigs argued that both land and slaves could be preserved best within the Union.Stanly's opponent, Thomas Ruffin, a secessionist Democrat, believed this not to be the case.According to Newberry's . . .

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