The Problem Solving Journey: Your Guide to Making Decisions and Getting Results

The Problem Solving Journey: Your Guide to Making Decisions and Getting Results

The Problem Solving Journey: Your Guide to Making Decisions and Getting Results

The Problem Solving Journey: Your Guide to Making Decisions and Getting Results

Synopsis

A hands-on guide to the art and science of problem solving--featuring examples of successful problem solvers. For executives and entrepreneurs, front-line supervisors and project leaders, this is an indispensable resource. The key principles are illustrated with brief, compelling stories that give the reader not only practical advice, but also an enjoyable way to think about how to apply it. This is one for the bookshelf of anyone who is interested in improving the way they get things done. Packed with substantive ideas, interesting stories of great problem solvers and useful how-to guidance material. Must-have for senior managers looking to improve organizational performance.

Excerpt

Men go out into the void spaces of the world for various reasons.

Some are actuated simply by a love of adventure, some have the keen thirst for scientific knowledge, and others again are drawn away from the trodden path by the "lure of little voices," the mysterious fascination of the unknown.

-SIR ERNEST SHACKLETON (1874-1922)

Take a moment and ask yourself this—what are the two or three toughest problems or opportunities you've ever solved? A daunting project? A difficult working relationship? A threatening situation? A complex question or decision? When you have the images of your experiences in mind, then consider—what were the lessons you learned from them? What were the things in each case that really made a difference and that could continue to make a difference in future situations? You've now taken the first step on the problem solving journey, thinking on a higher level, and if you read ahead, you'll never look back.

At 6:45 P.M., on October 24, 1915, Sir Ernest Shackleton was, however, starting to look back.He had begun an ocean voyage from England six months ago, and was now more than 10,000 miles from home and hundreds of miles from land on a frozen Arctic sea, in a single wooden ship with twenty-three men. Shackleton had made two previous attempts to be the first to reach the South Pole.Both times he had failed, although on one trip he came within 100 miles of his goal. He was eventually beaten to this historic discovery, yet he did not give up, but merely changed his objective. His problem that October night was how to cross the Antarctic continent, a journey of thousands of miles, first by sea and . . .

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