The Maya World: Yucatec Culture and Society, 1550-1850

The Maya World: Yucatec Culture and Society, 1550-1850

The Maya World: Yucatec Culture and Society, 1550-1850

The Maya World: Yucatec Culture and Society, 1550-1850

Synopsis

For the first time, the author aims to give a voice to the Maya themselves, basing his analysis entirely on his translations of hundreds of Yacatec Maya notarial documents most of which have never before received scholarly attention.

Excerpt

The Mayas of Yucatan were a subject people of the Spanish Empire from 1542 to 1821. During that time they kept legal and other records, written in their own language but in the roman alphabet; dated between 1557 and 1851, extant examples of material written by Maya notaries exist in libraries and archives in the United States, Mexico, and Spain. These records have received little scholarly attention, and this book is the product of an effort to locate, translate, and analyze the documents that survive.

My principal academic debt is to the teacher and mentor who provided the original advice, support, encouragement, and inspiration without which this work would not have come to fruition: James Lockhart. I profoundly value his guidance. I am also grateful to other scholars for their support and for their example: Howard Tomlinson at Wellington College, and Felipe Fernández-Armesto at Oxford University; at UCLA, it was an honor and a pleasure to work with the late E. Bradford Burns, H. B. Nicholson, Geoffrey Symcox, and Jossé Moya; at Tulane University, Victoria Bricker and the late Martha Robertson of the Latin American Library were extremely helpful to my research, as was Philip Thompson; Frances Karttunen, of the University of Texas, has been extraordinarily generous in her support and has contributed greatly to my understanding of the Maya language, as has William Hanks, of the University of Chicago. I value their friendship and generosity, as I do that of Kevin Gosner, Ruth Gubler, Marta Hunt, Susan Kellogg, Karen Powers, and Susan Schroeder. I should like to add a specific additional word of gratitude for detailed and extensive comments made on various drafts of this study by Victoria Bricker, Frances Karttunen, and James Lockhart. As copy editor, Shirley Taylor has made important contributions to the final product, as have Stanford's Norris Pope and John Feneron.

I also wish to thank the staffs of the Archivo General de la Nación in . . .

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