Assessment, Measurement, and Prediction for Personnel Decisions

Assessment, Measurement, and Prediction for Personnel Decisions

Assessment, Measurement, and Prediction for Personnel Decisions

Assessment, Measurement, and Prediction for Personnel Decisions

Synopsis

A practical view of assessment-based personnel decisions is offered with this book. The author argues that decisions about people in organizations are properly based on predictions, literal or implicit, about their probable contributions to the organization.

Excerpt

Frank Landy

A great deal can happen in 32 years. In 1964, I was a student in a graduate seminar being offered by Bob Guion on the topic of personnel testing. As a text, we were using the preSYSTEMation galley sheets of his forthcoming text to be published in the following year. It is now 1996, and I have had the privilege of reading and commenting on Bob's newest text. I have already blocked out a chunk of the year 2028--May and June to be exact--for reviewing his next effort. During the period between 1964 and 1996, I managed to extract a PhD from Bob, assume and retire from a University faculty position at Penn State University, and write several books on topics similar to those addressed in Personnel Testing.

Between 1964 and 1996, psychology, generally, and industrial and organizational psychology, specifically, have experienced more than a few "revolutions." In psychology, these revolutions would include the paradigm shifts from behaviorism to cognition and neuroscience, from trait theory to interactionism, and the analytic shift from noncausal to causal inference. In industrial and organizational psychology, the revolutions have included the appearance of new employment discrimination statutes (e.g., the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Civil Rights Act of 1991) and the further codification (some might say calcification) of existing discrimination statutes through case law and administrative guidelines (e.g., the Uniform Guidelines on Employee Selection Procedures). From a more substantive direction, there has been a marked shift toward legitimizing personality testing, toward developing more detailed specifications of both predictor and criterion domains, and away from the "holy trinity" of validity models. Analytically, meta-analysis has turned lead into gold by extracting general conclusions from previously confounded and severely limited single studies. All in all, we are in much better shape now than we were in 1964. All of these evolutionary and revolutionary changes are captured in this volume.

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