The History of Parliamentary Taxation in England

The History of Parliamentary Taxation in England

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The History of Parliamentary Taxation in England

The History of Parliamentary Taxation in England

Read FREE!

Excerpt

In a chapter of Hall's Chronicle having to do with the mid-reign history of Henry VIII occurs an instance of popular protest against arbitrary taxation. The people are complaining against the Commissions, says the Chronicler, bodies appointed by the Crown to levy taxes without consent of Parliament. "For thei saied," so goes the passage, "if men should geue their goodes by a Commission, then wer it worse than the taxes of Fraunce, and so England should be bond and not free." Hall's naïve statement is scarcely less than a declaration of the axiomatic principle of politics that self-taxation is an essential of self- government.

Writers on the evolution of the taxing power are inclined to go a step farther and believe that the liberty of a nation can be gauged most readily by the power of the people over the public purse. With a view so extended a narrative of the growth of popular control in . . .

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