Automation Funds and Displaced Workers

Automation Funds and Displaced Workers

Automation Funds and Displaced Workers

Automation Funds and Displaced Workers

Excerpt

The industrial revolution represented essentially a change of such magnitude in the pace of mechanization of production as to revolutionize the production process and the organization of production. That pace continued throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries on an ever more widespread basis and perhaps at an accelerating rate. And in the wake of mechanization came labor displacement and the consequent technological unemployment. It is clear, however, that this type of unemployment for workers generally is only temporary because the common experience of industrialized nations has been that total employment has increased steadily over the years to provide jobs both for those displaced by mechanization and for the constantly increasing labor force.

Nevertheless technological unemployment creates many kinds of distress for those displaced, and its threat has generated resistances to the introduction of labor-saving machinery and processes. In recent years the pace of technological change has been greater than ever, and a new name, automation, has been given to at least certain types of mechanization. And as automation has increased, so also has the technological or structural unemployment associated with it. This has in turn generated widespread concern and interest in methods and devices to alleviate the distress caused by such unemployment.

In this volume Professor Kennedy discusses many problems associated with technological unemployment in our . . .

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