De Cive: The Latin Version Entitled in the First Edition Elementorum philosophiae Sectio Tertia de Cive, and in Later Editions Elementa Philosophica de Cive

De Cive: The Latin Version Entitled in the First Edition Elementorum philosophiae Sectio Tertia de Cive, and in Later Editions Elementa Philosophica de Cive

De Cive: The Latin Version Entitled in the First Edition Elementorum philosophiae Sectio Tertia de Cive, and in Later Editions Elementa Philosophica de Cive

De Cive: The Latin Version Entitled in the First Edition Elementorum philosophiae Sectio Tertia de Cive, and in Later Editions Elementa Philosophica de Cive

Excerpt

HOBBES'S third and last continental tour with his pupils drew to an end in 1637 with a stay of some eight months in Paris, where he renewed his acquaintance with Mersenne and his circle. These visits had been a most formative experience for Hobbes as well as for his pupils. They had enabled him to meet or communicate with many of the most eminent European philosophers and scientists of his day; they had also exposed him to two influences which were to predominate in the development of his thought. On the second tour and at a relatively advanced age (past his fortieth year) he had discovered, or rediscovered, Euclid, and was deeply impressed not so much by the content as by the geometrical method and the great possibilities it offered for scientific and philosophic explanation.2 On his third continental tour Hobbes had found himself much preoccupied with the theory of motion. As he later recounted the matter, whether on ship, coach, or horse-back his mind constantly pondered the . . .
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