Control of Human Behavior, Mental Processes, and Consciousness: Essays in Honor of the 60th Birthday of August Flammer

Control of Human Behavior, Mental Processes, and Consciousness: Essays in Honor of the 60th Birthday of August Flammer

Control of Human Behavior, Mental Processes, and Consciousness: Essays in Honor of the 60th Birthday of August Flammer

Control of Human Behavior, Mental Processes, and Consciousness: Essays in Honor of the 60th Birthday of August Flammer

Synopsis

In this book, an international group of leading scientists present perspectives on the control of human behavior, awareness, consciousness, and the meaning and function of perceived control or self-efficacy in people's lives. The book breaks down the barriers between subdisciplines, and thus constitutes an occasion to reflect on various facets of control in human life. Each expert reviews his or her field through the lens of perceived control and shows how these insights can be applied in practice.

Excerpt

"I am not such a productive scientist, that I would deserve such an honor." This sentence paraphrases August Flammer's reaction when he learned about this volume and the authors, friends, colleagues and scientists from around the world who contributed to it in honor of his 60th birthday. We know there are many criteria that may make someone outstanding enough to deserve such an honor. However, there was never a doubt as to whether to proceed with this project. In many respects, Flammer scored highly throughout his career. But it is his productivity in different domains of psychology that makes him outstanding.

Born in 1938, Flammer began his professional career as a teacher at different levels of elementary and high school. He then studied psychology at the University of Fribourg, Switzerland, and in 1970, earned his doctorate in experimental psychology, statistics, and philosophy. His postdoctorate years (1972-1974) brought him first to the Institute for Mathematical Studies in the Social Sciences at Stanford University. There, he worked as a research fellow with a fellowship from the Swiss National Science Foundation. Afterwards, he stayed on as an honorary fellow at the Wisconsin Research and Development Center for Cognitive Learning at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. In 1975, in Switzerland, he was elected professor for experimental and educational psychology at the University of Fribourg. Since 1983, he has been full professor of developmental psychology at the University of Bern(Switzerland). In both Universities he was a dean. Flammer was a visiting professor at the Universities of Melbourne (Australia), Basel (Switzerland), Zurich (Switzerland), Bergen (Norway), and at the Max-Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin (Germany). He is a member of various scientific organizations and committees and associate editor of several national and international journals. He served several times in the role of organizer for scientific conventions, among them the world congress of ISSBD, 1998, in Bern.

Flammer is -- and always was -- a busy promoter of scientific psychology. As a 12-year member of the Research Council of the Swiss National Science Foundation, he was responsible for the evaluation of hundreds of grant proposals in the social science and humanities section. At this same institution, his concern for the junior research generation was apparent in his awarding of fellowships to promising candidates. Furthermore, approximately 30 students earned their doctorate degrees under his strict, yet supportive, supervision.

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