The American-Born in Canada: A Statistical Interpretation

The American-Born in Canada: A Statistical Interpretation

The American-Born in Canada: A Statistical Interpretation

The American-Born in Canada: A Statistical Interpretation

Excerpt

The importance of this volume will be recognized by all students of North American affairs. Although everyone knows that the United States and Canada have acted upon each other like powerful magnets, to draw those who, true to the adventurous spirit of the New World, followed where opportunity beckoned, yet only recently have attempts been made to obtain detailed studies, based upon comprehensive measurements of this great interplay between the North American peoples. This volume, however, is only one of three in this series which deals with the various aspects of Canadian-American migration. The volume by the late Professor Marcus Lee Hansen , entitled The Mingling of the Canadian and American Peoples, told the story as reflected in the annals of history. This remarkable book has already made its place as a fascinating and authoritative interpretation of the causes of migration and the factors which determined its direction, bringing into the well-known narrative of the westward movement of the American people the counterplay of movements across the Canadian-American border. A parallel volume to the present one deals with the Canadian-born in the United States. The author, Dr. Leon E. Truesdell, the Chief Statistician for Population of the Bureau of the Census at Washington, in The Canadian Born in the United States, offers for the first time an authoritative picture of the movement and settlement of Canadians in the United States.

The present volume deals with the migrations of Americans to Canada and their settlement there. The authors are Dr. R. H. Coats, who made the Dominion Bureau of Statistics at Ottawa a model which has been imitated by other countries, and the late Mr. M. C. Maclean, his Chief of the Social Analysis Branch, who coupled profound insight with his mathematical powers.

The fact that ninety per cent of the Canadians who have gone to the United States since 1880 migrated because of lack of economic opportunity in Canada and that most of them settled in blocks not far within the frontiers of the United States does not differentiate them in any fundamental way from other migrants of the same period. What marked them off from the European immigrant was the fact that they fundamentally belonged to the same racial stock as those among whom they settled and therefore never presented any serious problems of social and political readjustment.

It is significant, in the light of the problems of today, that there was little attempt by legislation to block the migrations to and fro until comparatively recent years. For instance, during the last quarter of the . . .

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