Pacific Cooperation: Building Economic and Security Regimes in the Asia-Pacific Region

Pacific Cooperation: Building Economic and Security Regimes in the Asia-Pacific Region

Pacific Cooperation: Building Economic and Security Regimes in the Asia-Pacific Region

Pacific Cooperation: Building Economic and Security Regimes in the Asia-Pacific Region

Synopsis

Contributing scholars assess the literature on international regimes and explore the relevance of organizations such as NAFTA, GATT, CSCE, and the EU for the Asia-Pacific region. The contributors also evaluate whether lessons for promoting cooperation in the security field can be drawn from the recent successes in regional economic cooperation. Among the specific topics: institution-building in the Pacific; comparing regional cooperation efforts in the Asia-Pacific and North America; the Asia-Pacific in the post-hegemonic world; and the evolving security discourse in the Asia-Pacific. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Excerpt

This volume contains original essays on economic and security cooperation in the Asia—Pacific region.One of our central objectives in bringing the contributors together was to promote cross-fertilisation of ideas among groups who, we believed, might benefit from more frequent interaction. The barriers that we were attempting to break down were two-fold: between theorists and practitioners of international relations; and between those who specialise in international economics and those whose primary interests are in international security. Despite the growth in regional cooperation in the Asia—Pacific region in the late 1980s and early 1990s, there had been no prior systematic attempt to determine what lessons might be learned for cooperation in the security realm from the recent successes in promoting region-wide economic cooperation, or to examine the relevance for the Asia—Pacific region of the largely Euro‐ centric literature on international regimes.None of the contributors to this book would claim that we have reached definitive answers to these questions: in many ways this book is an exploratory study that reveals how much further research remains to be done.

The project was organised by the Department of International Relations, Research School of Pacific Studies at the Australian National University and the Program on International Economics and Politics at the East—West Center, Hawaii, which also provided generous additional support.Our thanks go to the Program's Director, Charles E. Morrison, for his help in making the project the success that it was.Many people from the Research School of Pacific Studies helped in bringing the project to fruition: we are particularly indebted to David Sullivan and to Robin Ward who made significant contributions to the quality of the manuscript.Lynne Payne produced the final manuscript with her customary cheerfulness and efficiency, despite the unpredictable demands of the editors.

Andrew Mack and John Ravenhill
Canberra . . .

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