Voters, Parties, and Leaders: The Social Fabric of British Politics

Voters, Parties, and Leaders: The Social Fabric of British Politics

Voters, Parties, and Leaders: The Social Fabric of British Politics

Voters, Parties, and Leaders: The Social Fabric of British Politics

Excerpt

Much research has been done, since the end of the Second World War in particular, on the social aspects of British politics. This book is based to a large extent on the result of this research. I have mainly tried here to put the material together and to present a general picture. In doing so, I have often been obliged to summarize and I hope that I have not too often given a distorted image of the more detailed findings.

I relied so heavily on printed material that I had to decide what to do about quoting my sources. For the sake of not overburdening the text, I decided to limit footnotes to the barest minimum and to refer the reader to the fairly long bibliography which will be found at the end of the book. However, in a number of cases where my argument is based on a single piece of research, I have mentioned my source while going along. I take the opportunity to acknowledge here Messrs Routledge and Kegan Paul's permission to reproduce tables or parts of tables which appeared in G. D. H. Cole's Post-War Condition of Britain, in Benney,Gray, andPear's How People Vote, in R. K. Kelsall 's Higher Civil Servants in Britain, and in an article published by DrEysenck in the British Journal of Sociology in 1951. I also acknowledge the Oxford University Press's permission to use material appearing in J. D. Stewart's British Pressure Groups and to reproduce a table appearing in M. Stacey's Tradition and Change, A Study of Banbury, Messrs MacGibbon and Kee's permission to reproduce a table appearing in C. Jenkins 's Power at the Top, the Conservative Political Centre's and Dr M. Abrams's permission to reproduce a table appearing in The Future of the Welfare State, the Hansard Society for Parliamentary Government's permission to reproduce two tables from H. C. Mackenzie andR. S. Milne's Marginal Seat, and Political and Economic Planning's permission to quote from a table appearing in the survey of trade union membership published in Planning in July 1962.

Although I borrowed so much from many sources, I am, of course, responsible for the general line of the argument. I was . . .

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