The Messages and Papers of Woodrow Wilson - Vol. 1

The Messages and Papers of Woodrow Wilson - Vol. 1

The Messages and Papers of Woodrow Wilson - Vol. 1

The Messages and Papers of Woodrow Wilson - Vol. 1

Excerpt

From the day of his nomination for the presidency by the Democratic convention at Baltimore on July 2, 1912, to his death at Washington, February 3, 1924, Woodrow Wilson's leadership of the Democratic party was not in serious dispute.In the opening session of the Democratic convention held in New York City, June 24, 1924, less than half a year after his death, there was a deeply impressive demonstration in tribute to his memory, suggesting in some respects the corresponding tribute of the great Republican convention at Cleveland, only a few days earlier in the month, to the memory of President Harding, whose funeral services at the Capitol Mr.Wilson himself had attended in August of the previous year.Without disparagement to President Harding, for whom the country as well as the Republican party entertained high regard as well as genuine affection, it would be admitted by everyone that there was a marked difference in the two demonstrations.It was evident that in the Democratic mind Woodrow Wilson had already become a tradition and an historical character.Not only was he revered as a martyr, but his canonization had already been effected. He had been elevated to a place in the creed and the ritual of the party that was more lofty than that of Jefferson, more sacred than that of Jackson, more spiritual than that of Tilden or of Cleveland.

The public utterances of our Presidents from the very beginning constitute one of the leading sources of American history and biography.There is no other series of expressions in the field of statesmanship that can compare with the messages, papers, and various pronouncements of the . . .

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