Interracial Marriage in Hawaii: A Study of the Mutually Conditioned Processes of Acculturation and Amalgamation

Interracial Marriage in Hawaii: A Study of the Mutually Conditioned Processes of Acculturation and Amalgamation

Interracial Marriage in Hawaii: A Study of the Mutually Conditioned Processes of Acculturation and Amalgamation

Interracial Marriage in Hawaii: A Study of the Mutually Conditioned Processes of Acculturation and Amalgamation

Excerpt

The University of Hawaii through several of its departments is conducting studies relating to the character of the peoples of Hawaii and to their social relations. This volume is the outcome of one of these studies.

Hawaii presents an exceptional opportunity for the observation and study of a type of social process that has been going on in many parts of the world for a long time. As a result of migration, contacts are established between peoples who differ more or less in culture and in physical race traits. In the beginning the contacts tend to be mainly of an economic character and there is sentiment adverse to all relations of a more intimate character. At this stage the acculturation is almost wholly at the technological level and does not involve things greatly affected with sentiment. There is little tendency toward amalgamation if each group is made up of families. But gradually and without observation social relations of an increasingly intimate character come into existence, acculturation tends to take place at the level of the loyalties and, if the caste principle does not prevail, there is a more or less rapid amalgamation through intermarriage. That is, the two or more peoples become one people, one in blood relationship, one in culture and one in loyalty.

In relation to these processes Hawaii has some of the characteristics of a laboratory. Its population includes representatives of several European peoples and of several peoples of Asiatic origin. There are also the descendants of the native Polynesians and even a few thousand persons of African descent. The area and population of the Islands are not so large as to make the gathering of data an impossible task or to discourage one who seeks the insight that comes from a wide acquaintance with the people and their situations. Since Europeans and Asiatics began to come to Hawaii there . . .

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