His Exits and His Entrances: The Story of Shakespeare's Reputation

His Exits and His Entrances: The Story of Shakespeare's Reputation

His Exits and His Entrances: The Story of Shakespeare's Reputation

His Exits and His Entrances: The Story of Shakespeare's Reputation

Excerpt

"We have made a miracle of Shakespeare." So wrote Ralph Waldo Emerson in his Journal for March 19, 1835, taking cognizance of the vast amount of traditionary literature that had sprung up about the dramatist he so admired. If this was true in 1835, how much truer it is today, more than 125 years later, and who can doubt that it will be true as many generations hence? Since Emerson wrote, probably 50,000 editions, reviews, articles, pamphlets, and books have been written and published, countless thousands of productions of Shakespeare's plays have been acted, and many thousands of lectures have been given. Shakespeare as a literary subject has been introduced into virtually every Englishspeaking school, and into many foreign schools throughout the world. His plays have been translated into about seventy-five languages. Shakespeare, in sum, has become the most widely known writer in the world.

All the world has become Shakespeare's stage. The Bard has "played many parts" and has had "his exits and his entrances," but never has he been in total eclipse. If he is not today the author who is monopolizing the lion's share of the London stage . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.