Photoperiodism and Related Phenomena in Plants and Animals

Photoperiodism and Related Phenomena in Plants and Animals

Photoperiodism and Related Phenomena in Plants and Animals

Photoperiodism and Related Phenomena in Plants and Animals

Excerpt

An international symposium was held in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, October 29 to November 2, 1957, to discuss and correlate theories, observations, and hypotheses on photoperiodism and related phenomena in both plants and animals. The present volume is a record of the proceedings of this meeting, which was held under the auspices of the Committee on Photobiology of the National Academy of Sciences--National Research Council and was supported financially by the National Science Foundation.

The principal objective in organizing the symposium was to present a discussion of both plant and animal facets of photoperiodism in order that questions, problems, and observations unique and common to both areas be considered in a unified manner. It was felt that a great mutual advantage could be derived from such an exchange of views. The diversity of approaches in the study of photoperiodic phenomena in such a wide range of organisms and the scope of the field to be covered necessitated the scheduling of a large number of papers. Both current and previously unpublished research, as well as more inclusive review papers, were considered important in giving a panoramic view of the field of photoperiodism. After deliberation, it was decided not to record all extemporaneous remarks, but to encourage those who wished to have their ideas published to submit them in written form. Several short articles are included as a result of this procedure.

The first section of the volume deals with a photochemical analysis of the problems involved and discussion concerning the initial photoreaction. The second group of discussions is concerned with photoperiodic and related phenomena in plants, including seed germination, photomorphogenesis of seedlings and changes in vegetative structures, flowering, kinetics, and possible biochemical pathways resulting in the observed growth. The third division deals chiefly with . . .

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