The Child's Reality: Three Developmental Themes

The Child's Reality: Three Developmental Themes

The Child's Reality: Three Developmental Themes

The Child's Reality: Three Developmental Themes

Excerpt

It is a very great honor and privilege for me to give the Third Annual MacEachran Lectures. I am particularly pleased at being the first developmental psychologist to participate in this series and to be in the distinguished company of such psychologists as Frank A. Geldard, Benton J. Underwood, and John M. MacEachran. It has taken a long time, almost half a century, for developmental psychology to become a member in good standing of the scientific community. I therefore, take the invitation to deliver the MacEachran lectures not only as a recognition of personal achievement but much more as a recognition of the achievements of the discipline that I represent.

In preparing these lectures, I was placed in something of a dilemma. Our most recent work, on the construction of the self and self-differentiation in development, is very exciting but also still quite fragmentary. With so much yet to be done before an integrated presentation of the work is possible, I hesitated to inflict it upon you. Rather, what I have chosen to do is to present three lines of research that I have pursued over the years and for which there are established, as well as fresh, data.

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