Language of Vision

Language of Vision

Language of Vision

Language of Vision

Excerpt

This book, written by a young artist, bears witness that a third generation is on the march, willing to continue and to make secure the modern tradition which has developed in the course of this century; or, as Gyorgy Kepes states it: "To put earlier demands into concrete terms and on a still wider social plane."

It was not the rule in the nineteenth centuryfor younger generations to consciously continue the work of their predecessors. To do so is new; it means that we are in a period of consolidation.

The public, including those who govern and administer it, is still lacking the artistic, that is, the emotional training corresponding to our period. Both are plagued by the split which exists between advanced methods of thinking and an emotional background that has not caught up with these methods. The demand for continuity will become more and more the key word of this period. 'Every day something new' is the inheritance of the last century's disastrous urge. It still persists in many ways. Continuity does not mean standstill or reaction. Continuity means development. Every period changes, as the body does, from day to day. Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque were, in all their phases, constantly developing. But these changes have to be rooted in other than purely materialistic considerations. They have to grow from other sources: the medieval Kingdom of God, the absolutism of the seventeenth century, a political faith, or even an artistic credo.

'Every day something new' reveals helplessness combined with lack of inner conviction, and always eager to flatter the worst instincts of the public. It means change for change's sake, change for the sake of high-pressure salesmanship. It means demoralization.

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