Daedalus and Thespis: The Contributions of the Ancient Dramatic Poets to Our Knowledge of the Arts and Crafts of Greece

Daedalus and Thespis: The Contributions of the Ancient Dramatic Poets to Our Knowledge of the Arts and Crafts of Greece

Daedalus and Thespis: The Contributions of the Ancient Dramatic Poets to Our Knowledge of the Arts and Crafts of Greece

Daedalus and Thespis: The Contributions of the Ancient Dramatic Poets to Our Knowledge of the Arts and Crafts of Greece

Excerpt

The making of this volume has been a long labor of love. The impulse to the study of Greek art as it is presented in the Greek drama came from reading Euripides's Ion at Delphi in my first student days in Greece. The description of the temple-sculptures that Euripides in this tragedy gives suggested the possible wealth of such contributions to our knowledge of the arts and crafts of Greece that might be found in the rest of our corpus dramaticorum. To cull out the passages bearing upon the subject, it has been my joy, amid all the distractions of a college teacher and executive, to read and reread again and again all the ancient tragedy and comedy we have, including the fragments, to classify and organize the material, and make the combinations that have resulted from the study.

The question of a title for this work has not been easy to decide. In the Proceedings of the American Philological Association it has twice been called The Contributions of the Ancient Dramatic Poets to our Knowledge of the Arts and Crafts of Greece. This title is descriptive but too cumbersome; so I have decided to send forth the first volume under the caption of Daedalus and Thespis--Daedalus, the first artist and craftsman, and Thespis, the first dramatist of Hellas.

As Volume I has to do with Architecture and Topography, so Volume II will deal with the Sculpture, Volume III, with the Painting and Ceramics of Greece, as pictured to us by the dramatic poets. It is planned to include in the third volume complete Indexes--1) of all the passages cited from the ancient authors; 2) of all the artists named; 3) of the important subjects discussed. The first Index will also clear up any possible misunderstanding of the abbreviations of authors or titles quoted in the text. Most of them are the regularly accepted abbreviations and will cause no difficulty. "N.," for example, after a tragic fragment means Nauck's edition; "K." means Kock's Fragmenta Comicorum; "D.," Dindorf's Poetae Scenici Graeci.

I trust that the elevated figures will not be confusing, though they may have a triple significance: usually a small high 1 or 2 or 3 will refer to a footnote; but "R. " will mean the third edition ofRibbeck's Fragmenta, Roacher Myth. Lex., II will mean the second half of the second volume of the Mythologisches Lexikon, and so forth.

In this "Greekless age," I have thought it best to translate all the citations from the Greek authors quoted in the text, rarely in the footnotes; I am assuming a better state of things for the Latin, and generally leave the Latin excerpts to my readers' understanding.

I want to take this opportunity to express to my old friend, Professor Wilhelm Dörpfeld, greatest of archaeologists in this field, my very hearty thanks for his kindness in reading my manuscript and for the suggestions he offered, and to my former pupil, Miss Florence Feaster, for her invaluable help in verifying the many references.

WALTER MILLER University of Missouri

July 27, 1928 . . .

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