Human Rights and Third World Development

Human Rights and Third World Development

Human Rights and Third World Development

Human Rights and Third World Development

Synopsis

The intertwining of development and human rights is the subject of the twelve essays collected by the editors. The individual authors extensively examine the commonly held belief that economic development cannot take place in Third World countries without the short term sacrifice of political liberty and demonstrate that there is considerable evidence to the contrary. Following a theoretical stage-setting that concentrates on the severe power limitations and the dependency of weak Third World states, case studies focus on such issues as state terrorism, food, the right to modernize, refugees, and support of apartheid in Latin America, the People's Republic of China, the Middle East, and Africa. Several essays concern the implementation of human rights and the role of multinational corporations and international nongovernmental organizations in protecting them. The final essay considers the international framework of government, law, and organization as a means for implementing human rights development in the Third World.

Excerpt

Ved P. Nanda and George W. Shepherd, jr.

A common thread runs through the chapters that follow: human rights and Third World development are not competing but complementary goals. the thrust of these studies, that human rights and development concerns should mix if development in the Third World is to be realized and to have meaning for those inhabiting the Third World, is a reflection of the convergence of views reached at the 1982 summer seminar of the National Endowment for the Humanities which we co-directed. the theme stressing the indivisibility, interdependence, and equal importance of all human rights--civil and political and economic rights, and social and cultural rights--and the inseparable link between human rights and development, was presented by some of the authors of these studies at panel sessions at both the 1983 International Studies Association meeting in Mexico City and the 1983 Law and Society Meeting in Denver, Colorado. Following the National Endowment for the Humanities seminar and the panel sessions in Mexico City and Denver, these studies were revised for SYSTEMation.

Part I of the book is comprised of two chapters which raise pertinent theoretical questions and set the stage for case studies in Part ii and the concluding chapters in Part iii. George Shepherd's contribution is concerned with the severe power limitations of weak Third World states stemming from the interventions of the centers of power in the world system. Shepherd argues that developing states are subjugated to economic control and military dominance to the extent that their capacity for collective or individual freedom is seriously undermined. He characterizes the global political economy as tributary in nature. It therefore follows that Third World states are, in varying degrees, dependent upon the protection and support of the superpowers despite the apparent independence of their role within regions of the world. Through this system the rights and interests of the small states are generally sacrificed to the global interests of the superpowers. Thus violations of human rights are ignored and international legal . . .

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