Jewish Values

Jewish Values

Jewish Values

Jewish Values

Excerpt

The ideas and ideals set forth in the following pages -- the study of the Torah, the love and fear of God, the sanctification of the Name, trust in God, holiness, humility, love of neighbour, compassion, truth and peace -- are Jewish Values. The use of the adjective is not intended to suggest that these values are the invention, or the exclusive preserve, of Jews; still less that they are not to be found among non- Jews and in faiths other than Judaism. Basic to all the higher religions are ideals corresponding closely to those described as Jewish. Non-religious, as well as religious, ethical thinkers have expounded the worth of humility, truth, love and compassion, but a Jewish value means: (a) that it receives a special kind of emphasis in the Jewish tradition and (b) that it is no remote ideal but a real, vital force in the lives of Jews.

(a) These values are called Jewish because they receive a special kind of emphasis in the Jewish tradition.

Take the word value itself. It is highly significant that the word 'erekh, used for 'value' in the later Hebrew literature, originally meant no more than 'estimation' or 'assessment' and was used in the earlier sources for the idea of establishing the monetary worth of an object. In the great formative periods of Bible and Talmud there is no word for 'value' in the sense of abiding or absolute worth: the ancients saw no value in value. The genius of Biblical and Talmudic Judaism expressed itself far less in abstract thought patterns and far more in concrete applications. There are very few discussions on the nature of justice and righteousness but there are . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.