Acoustics and Architecture

Acoustics and Architecture

Acoustics and Architecture

Acoustics and Architecture

Excerpt

The last fifteen years have seen a rapidly growing interest, both scientific and popular, in the subject of acoustics. The discovery of the thermionic effect and the resulting development of the vacuum tube have made possible the amplification and measurement of minute alternating currents, giving to physicists a powerful new device for the quantitative study of acoustical phenomena. As a result, there have followed remarkable developments in the arts of communication and of the recording and reproduction of sound. These have led to a demand for increased knowledge of the principles underlying the control of sound, a demand which has been augmented by the necessity of minimizing the noise resulting from the ever increasing mechanization of all our activities.

Thus it happens that acoustical problems have come to claim the attention of a large group of engineers and technicians. Many of these have had to pick up most of their knowledge of acoustics as they went along. Even today, most colleges and technical schools give only scant instruction in the subject. Further, the fundamental work of ProfessorWallace Sabine has placed upon the architect the necessity of providing proper acoustic conditions in any auditorium which he may design. Some knowledge of the behavior of sound in rooms has thus become a necessary part of the architect's equipment.

It is with the needs of this rather large group of possible readers in mind that the subject is here presented. No one can be more conscious than is the author of the lack of scientific elegance in this presentation. Thus, for example, the treatment of simple harmonic motion and the development of the wave equation in Chap. II would be much . . .

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