Thomas Lodge

Thomas Lodge

Thomas Lodge

Thomas Lodge

Excerpt

About the middle of the last century the Rev. Joseph Hunter commented in his notebook on the difficulty of believing that the "Thomas Lodge" of Elizabethan times was at all points one and the same man. His reasons for so doubting were the incongruity of Lodge's various pursuits-- law, literature, buccaneering, and medicine; the want of allusion to his former life in his medical works; the lack of the M. D. title in non-medical works republished after he became a physician; and Anthony à Wood's statement that he descended from Lincolnshire instead of Shropshire. Yet as Hunter jotted down new entries from time to time, he saw that the later Doctor of Physic was one and the same man as the earlier poet, law-student, and adventurer.

Thus in 1883 Sir Edmund Gosse could write in a memoir for the Hunterian Club's Complete Works of Thomas Lodge: "If a full and continuous biography of Thomas Lodge could be recovered, it would possess as much interest to a student of Elizabethan manners and letters as any Memoir that can be imagined. It would combine, in a series of pictures, scenes from all the principal conditions of life in that stirring and vigorous age. It would introduce us to the stately civic life of London City, to Oxford in the first glow of humanism and liberal thought, to the dawn of professional literature in London, to the life of a soldier against Spain, to the adventures of a freebooting sailor on the high seas, to the poetry of the age, and then to its science, to the stage in London and to the anatomical lecture room in Avignon, to the humdrum existence of a country practitioner, and to the perilous intrigues of a sympathizer with . . .

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