The English Text of the Ancrene Riwle

The English Text of the Ancrene Riwle

The English Text of the Ancrene Riwle

The English Text of the Ancrene Riwle

Excerpt

The portion of the Ancrene Riwle preserved, with omissions and additions, in MS. Royal 8 C. 1, ff. 122 -143 , corresponds to Books II and III of the Nero text, long familiar in Morton's edition and now available in the edition of Miss Day for the Society. It is with reasonable appropriateness called in the manuscript a treatise on the five senses. It is not so much a transcription as a free adaptation of the original to a lay audience. The Royal manuscript is of the fifteenth century, of paper except for the flyleaves and with a written space of 7 1/8 x 4 1/8 inches. It is a collection of theological tracts, some in Latin, some in English. The treatise derived from the Ancrene Riwle (art. 5) is written in long lines, about 41 to the page, in a good current hand which appears to be the same as that of the Latin tracts of the Austin friar John Waldeby on the Lord's Prayer, the Ave Maria, and the Creed which precede it (arts. 1-4). Another hand beginning on f. 144 copied a treatise in English on the Seven Deadly Sins elsewhere attributed to Richard Lavenham, Richard II's Carmelite confessor (art. 6). The manuscript belonged to one Hugh Haverel in the sixteenth century and later to John Theyer, with whose collection it came to the Royal Library in about 1678.

Since the name Lichfield occurs in connexion with the paraphrase of the Ancrene Riwle, the Warner-Gilson catalogue observes: 'probably by William Lichfield, rector of Allhallows the Great (d. 1447), who is mentioned by Gascoigne (Liber Veritatum, s.v. Praedicator) as a preacher'. There is nothing improbable about this attribution. Lichfield was well known as a preacher. The London Chronicle for 1446-52 records his death on 26 October 1448 and adds 'the whiche was a good prechour and an holy man þat made in his dayes M iiij and iij sermones, as it was found in his bokes of his own hande writing'. These have not come down to us, but the sixteenth- century . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.