Impact of Divorce, Single Parenting, and Stepparenting on Children

Impact of Divorce, Single Parenting, and Stepparenting on Children

Impact of Divorce, Single Parenting, and Stepparenting on Children

Impact of Divorce, Single Parenting, and Stepparenting on Children

Synopsis

This book, a result of a conference sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, explores developmental and clinical evidence of how divorce, and the transition to single parenting and stepparenting affects children. Many of the articles collected here look at the legal measures being used to make such transitions easier for families.

Excerpt

The chapters presented in this volume grew out of a conference, "The Impact of Divorce, Single Parenting and Stepparenting on Children," sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and held in Bethesda, Maryland, May 6-7, 1985. Since its inception in 1965, the NICHD has strongly supported research on the family, particularly changes that affect the well-being of children. This conference provided an opportunity for two Institute behavioral programs, the Human Learning and Behavior Branch and the Demographic and Behavioral Sciences Branch, to bring together a broad team of experts to examine demographic trends affecting the living arrangements of parents and children, developmental and clinical evidence of how such transitions affect children, and legal issues surrounding these changes.

Chaired by E. Mavis Hetherington and Josephine D. Arasteh, the conference addressed issues concerned with divorce, divorce mediation and custody arrangements, single parenting and stepparenting as they impact on the well-being of children. Developmental psychologists, clinicians, demographers, and legal experts joined in examining current findings on how such transitions in family life are affecting both the adjustment of parents and of children as well as the legal measures being tried to make such transitions easier for families. Unanswered questions and areas that need further research were identified. At the conference, some participants presented only preliminary findings pending further data collection and analysis. The chapters in this volume offer more fully developed findings supplemented by new chapters that provide other relevant information that was cited by the conference participants.

E. Mavis Hetherington

Josephine D. Arasteh . . .

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