Rhetoric of Black Revolution

Rhetoric of Black Revolution

Rhetoric of Black Revolution

Rhetoric of Black Revolution

Excerpt

No period in American history has been so thoroughly volatile with the rhetoric of militant blacks as the last fifteen years. With the emergence of Martin Luther King, Jr., as the great moral force in the struggle for equality, Americans looked forward to the idyllic state when prejudice and racism would give way to the dreamed of brotherhood. But King was killed. Even before the murder of the eloquent drum major for justice, the civil rights movement appeared to be exhausting itself. The decline of the nonviolent campaign was accompanied by the rising voices of Black Power advocates and black nationalists who insisted on human rights for all Americans at any cost whatsoever. Where King and others had pleaded, the militants demanded. In city after city, enraged blacks went on rampage against what they considered the system of their oppression.

This book is an attempt to discuss the origins, context, strategies, topics, and audience of the rhetoric of black revolution. The term black revolution is used in the broad sense of drastic, immediate change in the social, political, or economic structure.

In the first chapter, I have sought to describe in limited detail the rhetorical situation that produces and sustains the rhetoric of black revolution. This chapter necessarily deals with the nature of the rhetoric insofar as that rhetoric is . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.