United States Relations with China: With Special Reference to the Period 1944-1949

United States Relations with China: With Special Reference to the Period 1944-1949

United States Relations with China: With Special Reference to the Period 1944-1949

United States Relations with China: With Special Reference to the Period 1944-1949

Excerpt

For more than half a century the policy of the United States toward China has been based on the twin principles of (1) equality of commercial opportunity, and (2) the maintenance of the territorial and administrative integrity and political independence of China. Although the United States has at times recognized the special relations between China and neighboring countries, it has also recognized and asserted that the domination of China by any one Power or any group of Powers is contrary to the interests both of China and of the United States.The United States has advocated a policy of noninterference in the internal affairs of China.The United States has taken the position that the Chinese people should be given time to develop those political institutions which would best meet their needs in the modern world.The United States has also sought to prevent third Powers from utilizing disturbances within China as an opportunity for individual or collective aggrandizement.The United States has long been interested in the creation of conditions which would permit the development of a stable Chinese political organism, and in its relations with China has supported the principle of peaceful settlement of disputes in accordance with the generally recognized precepts of international law.

II. DEVELOPMENT OF BASIC AMERICAN POLICY

EQUALITY OF COMMERCIAL OPPORTUNITY

During the nineteenth century United States policy toward China was expressed by treaties and ordinary diplomatic procedures designed to secure equality of trading rights in China. The fundamental principle underlying American relations with China—equality of commercial opportunity—was incorporated in the first treaty between the two Powers, the Treaty of Wanghia signed on July 3, 1844, in the . . .

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