Aspects of Ottoman History: Papers from CIEPO IX, Jerusalem

Aspects of Ottoman History: Papers from CIEPO IX, Jerusalem

Aspects of Ottoman History: Papers from CIEPO IX, Jerusalem

Aspects of Ottoman History: Papers from CIEPO IX, Jerusalem

Excerpt

The Ninth Congress of the Comité International des Études Préottomanes et Ottomanes (CIEPO) convened in Jerusalem at the end of July 1990. It focused principally on three topics: the Ottoman city; the foreign relations of the Ottomans; and local and regional sources for Ottoman history. Scholars attended from more than a dozen countries and presented over 120 papers. Of these, approximately half were by Israeli scholars from the five major universities, reflecting the importance of Ottoman studies in Israel.

This volume could include only a sample of the papers delivered in Jerusalem. Those papers covered an even broader spectrum of topics than the ones published here. The ones selected mirror the primary concentrations of the meeting, but their scope reflects the tremendous range of subjects to be addressed even within very defined parameters. The twenty-six articles are divided into four categories: Towns; Early Ottoman History; International Relations; and Literary, Administrative, and Other Sources.

Cities have long been a focus for research on the myriad aspects of Muslim societies and culture. As the principal settings for political, administrative, economic, religious, academic, and artistic endeavors, the cities have consistently drawn the attention of chroniclers, travelers, and scholars. Most of the contemporary historical sources were written about cities and highlight the urban over the rural activities of the people who resided there. Most archives originated in cities and are still located there today. Lively debate continues over the existence and nature of a paradigmatic "Islamic city," whether typical structural and functional characteristics exist which identify it as such. A variety of arguments for and against the existence of an "Islamic city" have been forwarded in the attempt to formulate an agreed-upon definition. Meanwhile, there is still room for, perhaps even a dire need for, empirical studies that will amplify our knowledge and understanding of the cities in question.

Cities of the Ottoman empire have drawn consistent attention in modern research. Numerous queries have been raised as to their Ottoman identity, parallel to the discussion of the Islamic city".

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.