Breaking into Print: Being a Compilation of Papers Wherein Each of a Select Group of Authors Tells of the Difficulties of Authorship & How Such Trials Are Met

Breaking into Print: Being a Compilation of Papers Wherein Each of a Select Group of Authors Tells of the Difficulties of Authorship & How Such Trials Are Met

Breaking into Print: Being a Compilation of Papers Wherein Each of a Select Group of Authors Tells of the Difficulties of Authorship & How Such Trials Are Met

Breaking into Print: Being a Compilation of Papers Wherein Each of a Select Group of Authors Tells of the Difficulties of Authorship & How Such Trials Are Met

Excerpt

A book is born when it is published.

Kipling says in his autobiography, "Any fool, I knew to my sorrow, could write." Later he adds, "Any other fool could review." Between the writing and the reviewing comes that creative advent, the breaking into print.

Sometimes the experience may be simple and almost painless; sometimes it may be long-drawn-out and disheartening. The variations seem limited only by the number of participants. And now, in this book, twenty authors describe in a friendly, intimate, almost confessional manner, how they went through the experience of getting published. An unusually sympathetic audience inspired these revelations. Those who promptly gave support to The Colophon, when the quarterly was announced in 1929 , revered the authors of the books they loved. The authors quickly sensed the feeling and quality of this group, and expressed themselves freely, in a manner almost "off the record." Thus during five years The Colophon gathered twenty of these confessions.

In order to tell the readers of this book how each of the authors works, a group of questions was prepared and mailed. And in the course of time, after some prodding here and there, all the answers arrived and now appear in the biographical notes. They vary not only in length but also in the methods they describe. One author explains that he puts nothing on paper until his thought is in a final state; he does not even revise the proof of the type form. Another begins with sketchy notes, which are supplemented and extended, rewritten and condensed; his number of changes is determined solely by the urgency of going to press. Because many of these explanations have . . .

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