The Antipodes

The Antipodes

The Antipodes

The Antipodes

Excerpt

Brome contracted to compose The Antipodes for the Cockpit Theater in August, 1636. He wrote it during one of London's severest plagues, which began in April, 1636, and lasted until December, 1637. As a result all theaters were ordered closed from May 12, 1636, to October 2, 1637. Although Brome had signed a contract to write exclusively for the Salisbury Court Company, The Antipodes was intended forWilliam Beeston, who, with his father Christopher Beeston, was starting a company of boy actors, known as Beeston's Boys, at the Cockpit Theater. In a signed note appended to the text of the 1640 quarto, Brome writes:

You shal find in this Booke more then was presented upon the Stage, and left out of the Presentation, for superfluous length (as some of the Players pretended) I thoght good al should be inserted according to the allowed Original; and as it was, at first, intended for the Cock-pit Stage, in the right of my most deserving Friend Mr. William Beeston, unto whom it properly appertained; and so I leave it to thy perusal, as it was generally applauded, and well acted at Salisbury Court.

The circumstances behind this anomalous note are explained in two 1640 Requests Proceedings Documents, a complaint filed on February 12 by the Salisbury Court Company, and Richard Brome's answer of March 6 to the charges. According to the documents, in April . . .

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