After the Cold War: American Foreign Policy, Europe, and Asia

After the Cold War: American Foreign Policy, Europe, and Asia

After the Cold War: American Foreign Policy, Europe, and Asia

After the Cold War: American Foreign Policy, Europe, and Asia

Synopsis

The end of the Cold War provides challenges and opportunities for American foreign policy leadership that arguably have been equalled in modern times only by the period in which the Cold War began.

Excerpt

The publication of an updated edition of After the Cold War: American Foreign Policy, Europe and Asia has provided a welcome opportunity to review and reflect upon the volume. I believe the basic themes and contours of the study have stood up well, at least over the short term of the several years since the manuscript was completed in 1996. Certainly the steadily growing importance in contemporary international relations of both the mass media and the private commercial realm has been confirmed. the spread of both representative democracy and relatively open competitive markets has now reached a point where any broad global reversal of the trend is difficult to conceive.

Very different, however, is the view, especially popular currently in the United States, that the business cycle and recessions have been abolished and that - by implication — the world has somehow become relatively easy to manage. the difficulty of perceiving emerging problems on the horizon of policy, especially in the midst of a relatively stable and extremely prosperous age, underscores the basic challenge confronting leadership at the national level and for that matter other levels, including not only multinational corporations but virtually all organizations, large and small. Anticipating surprise, or even the full implications of partially anticipated developments, is at the heart of successful leadership, whether the chief executive attempting to guide a nation or the individual attempting to manage a career. After literally decades of anxiety, combined with periods of outright fear, the Cold War has been replaced by an era in which complacency, excessive self-confidence and occasional hubris encourage misperception and miscalculation. President Bill Clinton, in his self‐ indulgence and self-righteousness, personifies this era to an unnerving degree. the crucial variable of leadership, therefore, is emphasized in the Epilogue as in the original body of the text.

From high policy to immediate work environment, Carthage College in Kenosha Wisconsin has provided a most congenial environment for reviewing and updating this work. Initial contacts with President F. Gregory Campbell and Dean Kurt Piepenberg were followed by a series of conversations with other administrators, faculty and staff, concluding in appointment in April 1998 as the A.W. and Mary Margaret Clausen Distinguished Professor of Political Economy and World Business. Alden W. 'Tom' Clausen is former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Bank of America as well as President of the World Bank. He and his wife Peggy . . .

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