D. H. Lawrence: Modes of Fictional Style

D. H. Lawrence: Modes of Fictional Style

D. H. Lawrence: Modes of Fictional Style

D. H. Lawrence: Modes of Fictional Style

Synopsis

". . . Padhi . . . presents many helpful close readings of Lawrence's fiction, and the reader leaves this study with renewed appreciation of Lawrence's achievement."¿MODERN FICTION STUDIES

Excerpt

Several years ago, Mark Schorer, in an article entitled "On Lady Chatterley's Lover" (published in the maiden issue of Evergreen Review), wrote about how Lawrence's mind "constantly moved as each novel shrugged off its predecessor, at the same time that his techniques moved through a wide range of fascinating experimentation" and lamented that until then the novelist's fictional style remained "almost entirely unexamined by criticism." The present book is a modest attempt in that direction. It identifies five major modes in the author's fictional style and discusses these in five related chapters. From time to time, I must admit, I have been inclined to treat the modes in such a comprehensive way that it might seem I have run the risk of blurring my main considerations—where my writing becomes concerned with more general questions of form—although I feel that language, form, characterization, or imagination touch upon, and indeed flow into one another, and that any discussion of Lawrence's fictional style must take into account these more familiar aspects of his art. I have tried to describe Lawrence's expressive power and, wherever possible, indicate those subtle connections—those delicate filaments—that link the verbal fabric before us to the immensities under the skin.

It is a pleasure to acknowledge here my great debt to the excellent writings of F. R. Leavis, Harry T. Moore, Graham Hough, Mark Spilka, Keith Sagar, Eugene Goodheart, Julian Moynahan, Mark Schorer, J. I. M. Stewart, Frank Kermode, John Worthen, Gamini Salgado and Philip Hobsbaum. I am extremely grateful to the following, who at different times have read portions of the manuscript and made useful suggestions: Professor Mark Spilka of Brown University, Dr. Keith Sagar of the University of Manchester, Professor Ian Gregor of the University of Kent at Canterbury, Dr. John Worthen of the University College of Swansea, Dr.Dennis Jackson of the University of Delaware and editor of The D. H. Lawrence Review, and Professor Frederick P. W. McDowell of the University of Iowa.

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