History of the Labor Movement in the United States - Vol. 6

History of the Labor Movement in the United States - Vol. 6

History of the Labor Movement in the United States - Vol. 6

History of the Labor Movement in the United States - Vol. 6

Synopsis

Labor and the Red Scare; Seattle and Winnipeg general strikes; Boston telephone and police strikes; Streetcar strikes in Chicago, Denver, Knoxville, Kansas City; strikes in clothing, textile, coal and steel; The open-shop drive; Strikes and Black-white relationships; the AFL and the Black worker; the IWW; Communist Party founded; Political action 1918-1920.

Excerpt

In the fifth volume of my multivolume History of the Labor Movement in the United States: the afl in the Progressive Era, 1910-1915, I traced the story of American labor's economic and political activities in one of the most crucial eras in its development. the present volume brings the story to the eve of America's entrance into World War I. in the next (or seventh) volume, I will carry the story to the declaration of war by the United States against Germany and the other Central Powers in April, 1917. in the process I will trace the position of the labor and Socialist movements toward U.S. imperialism from the turn of the twentieth century, and toward the events between the outbreak of World War I in August, 1914 and America's entrance almost three years later.

The present volume covers a shorter time span than the previous ones. This has been necessary because most of the movements and labor struggles discussed here have been totally ignored or casually treated in the fourth volume of the Commons-Wisconsin History of Labor the United States (1896-1932) bySelig Perlman and Philip Taft. As in the previous volumes, the focus in the present work is on organized movements and resistance, on workers who belonged to or sought to belong to trade unions, and on those who, as in the case of Blacks and women, had to wage a persistent (and often futile) struggle to convince the racist, sexist, and craft-oriented labor leaders that there was a place in the American labor movement for all workers, regardless of skill, race, color, sex, or national origin.

A number of American scholars still cling to the view that unless a work on American labor emphasizes exclusively the new trend in labor historiography associated with the approach of E. P. Thompson in England and Herbert Gutman and David Montgomery in the United States, it is merely a continuation of the Commons-Wisconsin School. a work, in their opinion, to merit the label of "labor history" must focus on community, family, social relations, and cultural traditions. Should it deal with the development of working-class institutions and conflicts . . .

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