Radical Caribbean: From Black Power to Abu Bakr

Radical Caribbean: From Black Power to Abu Bakr

Radical Caribbean: From Black Power to Abu Bakr

Radical Caribbean: From Black Power to Abu Bakr

Excerpt

There is a common thread running through Brian Meeks' political biography and that is the link between his political activism in Trinidad, Jamaica, and in the Grenada revolution (1979-1983) and his intellectual efforts to theorize the praxis of Caribbean radicalism. Meeks is concerned with the role of political revolutionaries, the ambit of political action and the complex of relations between agency and the material context of Caribbean societies. This collection of seven essays continues his reflections on issues he has probed in his book Caribbean Revolutions and Revolutionary Theory: an Assessment of Cuba, Nicaragua and Grenada (1993). This volume brings together conjunctural analyses of the 1970 revolution in Trinidad, the 1990 Muslimeen assault led by Abu Bakr on the Trinidadian state, and Jamaica in the mid nineties, along with review articles on C. Y. Thomas' work The Rise of the Authoritarian State in Peripheral Societies , Rod Aya 's Rethinking Revolutions and Collective Violence and a political re-reading of C. L. R. James' classic 1938 volume Black Jacobins . The conjunctural analyses have rich and fresh insights into political behaviour, social relations, the erosion of hegemonic values, and the role of the state in the English-speaking Caribbean. In the review essays on comparative revolutions, Meeks battles with theories of revolutions -- from the volcanic theories through to the structuralist interpretations of Theda Skocpol, rational choice Marxism, and the economic determinism of some Marxist writing and scholarship.

All of this is the backdrop to his preoccupation with the role of human intervention. The matter of agency is a theme that crops up explicitly in all the theoretical essays and implicitly in the conjunctural analyses. Brian Meeks' political narratives of Trinidadian politics twenty-five years ago and today, Jamaica in the 1990s, and the Grenada revolution enable us to go beyond the formal characterizations of politics in the English-speaking Caribbean as a relatively stable democratic area with periodic elections and Westminster-type political systems.

Readers of Caribbean Revolutions and Revolutionary Theory will be familiar with the identification of the state-building middle class revolutionaries and his rejection of economic determinism. In Radical Caribbean: from Black Power to Abu Bakr he shifts the focus from the state to the problem of how to transform hegemonic values. He writes:

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.