Lester F. Ward: The American Aristotle; a Summary and Interpretation of His Sociology

Lester F. Ward: The American Aristotle; a Summary and Interpretation of His Sociology

Lester F. Ward: The American Aristotle; a Summary and Interpretation of His Sociology

Lester F. Ward: The American Aristotle; a Summary and Interpretation of His Sociology

Excerpt

Lester F. Ward, admittedly the great American pioneer in the field of sociology, lived his quiet yet strenuous life of threescore and ten, and died in 1913 in the city of Washington, where a large part of his life had been spent. His death was almost unnoticed by the press, though deeply regretted by his fellow-workers in sociology and his colleagues at Brown University.

The first half of Ward's life was spent in the midst of poverty on the frontier, as a soldier in the Civil War, and as a participant in the Darwinian controversies of the seventies. The latter half was devoted to the study of science and philosophy and to the formation and elaboration of his system of sociology, with its stress on psychic factors and telic progress. Throughout his life he sought to synthesize knowledge and to emphasize the necessity of its general diffusion among all social classes. He was at once a scientist, a synthetic philosopher, and a prophet of progress among men, through sociocracy. Such thinkers in the long run never die; in later years their teachings become recognized and applied, and their names are added to the roll of the immortals.

Among the intellectuals of Europe he was concededly an equal, as his correspondence plainly shows. In the United States he was a recognized authority in the several fields of science in which he studied and wrote. In labor circles at home and abroad, he was often quoted because of his interest in the larger education and advancement of the workers of the world. Women who sought rights and greater opportunities for their sex, found in him a powerful advocate. He taught of a social progress that was to come, not merely for or through the privileged few, but by the united efforts and for the benefit of the whole people.

Ward's works are written in simple language and clear English, but seem complex to many because of his wealth of scientific illustration and his fondness for expressing an exact meaning in some newly coined word. He failed to realize that the average man is not familiar with the classical languages and the sciences. For this reason there is . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.