Contradiction and Conflict: The Popular Church in Nicaragua

Contradiction and Conflict: The Popular Church in Nicaragua

Contradiction and Conflict: The Popular Church in Nicaragua

Contradiction and Conflict: The Popular Church in Nicaragua

Synopsis

Sabia examines the complex interaction of religious belief and political inspiration among internal divisions of Nicaragua's popular church. Contradiction and Conflict explores the rich history, ideology, and development of the popular church in Nicaragua. From careful assessments within the context of Nicaragua's revolutionary period (1970s-1990), this book explains the historical conditions that worked to unify members of the Christian faith and the subsequent factors that fragmented the Christian community into at least four identifiable groups with religious and political differences, contradictions, and conflicts. Debra Sabia describes and analyzes the rise, growth, and fragmentation of the popular church and assesses the effect of the Christian base communities on religion, politics, and the nation's social revolutionary experiment.

Excerpt

This work explores the rich history, ideology, and development of the popular church in Nicaragua. Examined within the revolutionary period of Nicaragua's history (1970s-1990s), the study investigates the historical conditions that worked to unify members of the Christian faith and those subsequent factors that fragmented the popular coalition.

Based on research conducted in Nicaragua, and primarily focused on three Christian base communities in Managua, the book gathers an assembly of voices that offer understanding into the development and nature of the popular church. Yet the eloquence of those voices belies a fundamental problem: Divergent notions of the popular church exist in Nicaragua. While a generalized conception of this church and its characteristics exists, it has not escaped the effects of local interpretations and doctrinal elaborations.

In dealing with the complexity of this problem, this book presents a typology as a means for exploring and thinking about the religious and political differences, contradictions, and conflicts evident among the progressive sector of Catholics. the typology constructed for this study has borrowed from the work and contribution of Max Weber's methodological approach of ideal types.

The popular church in Nicaragua has been conceived of and . . .

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