Answering Back: Girls, Boys, and Feminism in Schools

Answering Back: Girls, Boys, and Feminism in Schools

Answering Back: Girls, Boys, and Feminism in Schools

Answering Back: Girls, Boys, and Feminism in Schools

Synopsis

This groundbreaking collection exposes the volatility of gender reform programs currently in practice in Australia. The importance of unique demographics and local cultures is considered as the book discusses how to make more equitable environments for boys and girls in the school system. With a deep knowledge of gender issues in schools and of feminist theories, policies and practices, this compelling and provocative collection will surprise, unsettle and inspire parents, teachers and researchers.

Excerpt

There is something remarkably different about the changes the world is currently experiencing. Theorists such as Stuart Hall use the term 'New Times' to refer to these social, economic, political and cultural changes, characterised by simultaneous differentiation and fragmentation and homogeneity and standardisation. Others speak of globalisation to capture the essence of these changes. No one is able to escape their impact because they shape the context, the material and the cultural conditions of existence within which we must now interpret our lives and construct our futures. No study of education can afford to overlook the ways in which New Times might serve to define the conditions of pedagogic work and the parameters of educational possibilities. The challenge facing educators then is to understand New Times and to respond ethically, strategically and effectively. It is this challenge that forms the basic premise of the books published in this series.

Feminist-inspired changes have been one element of these emerging New Times. Throughout the world governments have had to respond to feminist demands for policies to improve the position of women in society. In Australia over the last two decades the feminist engagement with the state has seen the development of a range of policies concerned with improving the position of girls in schooling. We can trace a lineage her at the national level from Girls, School and Society (1975), through Girls and Tomorrow (1984), which recommended the creation of a national policy for girls' schooling, to the actual achievement of . . .

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