In the Day's Work

In the Day's Work

In the Day's Work

In the Day's Work

Synopsis

To preach and at the same time to practice lies unfortunately beyond the power of most human beings, and so Daniel Updike’s new volume has at least one distinction: it not only formulates the laws of good printing, but it embodies the standards which have made Updike one of the greatest modern printers and have placed his Merrymount Press among the most important printing-houses of the world. His three essays are entitled “On the Planning of Printing,” “Style in the Use of Type,” and “The Seven Champions of Typography.” The book will be a source of instruction and delight to everyone who occasionally needs the services of a printer, and especially to book-collectors as a compendium of typographical taste.

Excerpt

It must of necessity be," said Sir Joshua Reynolds, "that even works of genius, like every other effect, as they must have their cause, must also have their rules; it cannot be by chance that excellencies are produced with any constancy or any certainty, for this is not the nature of chance: but the rules by which men of extraordinary parts -- and such as are called men of genius -- work, are either such as they discover by their own peculiar observations, or of such a nice texture as not easily to admit being expressed in words. Unsubstantial, however, as these rules may seem, and difficult as it may be to convey them in writing, they are still seen and felt in the mind of the artist; and he works from them with as much certainty as if they were embodied upon paper. It is true these refined principles cannot always be made palpable, as the . . .

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