Intermediate-Size Cities as Growth Centers: Applications for Kentucky, the Piedmont Crescent, the Ozarks, and Texas

Intermediate-Size Cities as Growth Centers: Applications for Kentucky, the Piedmont Crescent, the Ozarks, and Texas

Intermediate-Size Cities as Growth Centers: Applications for Kentucky, the Piedmont Crescent, the Ozarks, and Texas

Intermediate-Size Cities as Growth Centers: Applications for Kentucky, the Piedmont Crescent, the Ozarks, and Texas

Excerpt

This book is devoted to a consideration of growth center policy within the context of the United States. Although it shares a great deal in common with my Rural Poverty and the Urban Crisis, its emphases are quite different. For example, in contrast to the earlier work this book gives considerable attention to growth center theory and to growth center policies that have been introduced in other countries. Criteria for growth center policy also receive much more attention here. Rural Poverty and the Urban Crisis contained proposals for a growth center strategy based on intermediate-size cities, but few specific cases were cited. The present study devotes four chapters to detailed case studies of growth centers with relevance to lagging areas. There also is a chapter on the problems which are most likely to arise in attempts to implement the proposed growth center measures.

This study was made possible by the financial assistance of the Office of Economic Research, Economic Development Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. It was carried out at the University of Kentucky and at the Center for Economic Development of the University of Texas under its Program on the Role of Growth Centers in Regional Development. Of course, the views presented do not necessarily reflect those of the agency. I have benefitted from the technical and moral support of many persons within the Economic Development Administration, particularly Gerald Duskin, whose initiative led to this undertaking, John Kaler, Roger Prior, and Samuel Rosenblatt. I have also learned a great deal from faculty colleagues and students at the University of Kentucky and the University of Texas. My coworker N. Dann Milne has been especially helpful during our association at both universities. I am grateful to Michael Curley for his work on South Texas and to William Gruben for his valuable assistance in the South Texas survey; to Eldon J. Nosari for his work on the Ozarks region; to Jean Shackelford for her investigations of self-sustained growth thresholds; to Alan Winger and Gary Mammel for their studies on the housing problem; and to Richard YuKhin for his important contributions to the section on Eastern Kentucky. Thanks are due to David Hirschberg and Gay Irwin for help on migration analyses. The invaluable administrative support of Charles Haywood and F. Ray Marshall must also be acknowledged. My contacts with colleagues from other countries through the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development in Geneva, Switzerland, have also proven very valuable. I finally would like to thank Pamela Pate for her able cartographic and secretarial assistance.

I wish to thank a number of sources for permission to use materials published elsewhere. The section on the French School of growth pole theory in Chapter 2 is adapted from my French Regional Planning (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1968). A portion of Chapter 3 appeared in modified . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.