The Baltic Nations and Europe: Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania in the Twentieth Century

The Baltic Nations and Europe: Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania in the Twentieth Century

The Baltic Nations and Europe: Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania in the Twentieth Century

The Baltic Nations and Europe: Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania in the Twentieth Century

Synopsis

Of all the Soviet Union's subject nationalities, the three Baltic republics, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, were the most determined and best organised in seizing the opportunities created by glasnost and perestroika to win freedom from Moscow's grip.
At the time of first publication, in 1991, the final section of the book was speculative. Now for this revised edition, the authors have provided a new final chapter which brings the story up to date -- and the three republics to political independence again.

Excerpt

The first edition of this book was completed in November 1990. It was not published until November 1991. We predicted that the Baltic states would regain their independence. By the time the book came out they had done so. For this revised edition we are taking the opportunity to make extensive revisions, partly to correct some errors, but more importantly to bring the story up to date. We are grateful to Longman for supporting our original project so enthusiastically, as well as encouraging us to produce a revised edition.

There are many other debts that we are happy to acknowledge. For essential financial support we are grateful to the following: the British Academy; the British Council; the small grants committees of the Universities of Bradford and Newcastle upon Tyne; the History Department of Newcastle University; the Baltic Research Unit at Bradford.

During our work we have been fortunate to have enjoyed the hospitality of a number of individuals and institutions. They include: Richard Langhorne and the Fellows of St John's College Cambridge; Tony Badger, formerly of Newcastle and now at Cambridge; Rolf Ahmann and Erwin Oberländer of the University of Mainz; the Department of European Studies, University of Bradford; the Estonian Academy of Sciences and the Estonian Institute in Tallinn. For technical help in preparing the graphs and tables we are indebted to George Kazamias, of the Department of European Studies at Bradford University.

Inevitably, we have made free use of the expertise, time and attention of archivists and librarians. Among these, we would particularly like to thank Henry Gillett of the Bank of England archive. Thanks . . .

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